XP Faster : Stopping Unneeded Startup Services

26 04 2007

Mempercepat kinerja windows XP dengan menonaktifkan  beberapa service yang dirasakan  tidak perlu …

namun perlu perhatian extra, agar tidak salah dalam mengaplikasikannya

Along with the core operating system and programs that Windows XP runs when it starts, there is also a host of services involved. Many of these services are necessary for Windows XP to operate correctly. However, many of them are for features in Windows XP that you may not use at all. You can peruse the services and disable any service that you do not want to run. The fewer services that run, the more quickly Windows XP will boot.

Caution:
Exercise caution when stopping services. If you do not know what a service does or are unsure of the ramifications of stopping the service, leave it alone. Some services are critical to Windows XP’s operations, so make sure you understand what the service is before you disable it.

To reduce the number of services that start on bootup, you can access two different areas of Windows XP. The first is the System Configuration Utility. The Services tab shows you the services that start when the computer boots (see Figure 4-1).

You can stop a service from starting by simply clearing the check box next to the service and clicking OK. However, before you do so, there is another way to disable services that you may prefer because the interface gives you more information about the service in question.
Open Control Panel/Administrative ToolsServices or else select Start/Run, type services.msc, and click OK. Either way, you see the Services console (see Figure 4-2).

I prefer to use the Services console instead of the System Configuration Utility because it describes what the service does. Additionally, you can double-click a service and examine its properties.

Notice the Startup Type column in Figure 4-2. This information lists whether the service is automatic or manual. Manual services are only started in Windows XP when you start a process that requires the service. Some other process may require the service that has a “dependency” relationship with it; in this case, the dependency service will start, as well. Because these services do not start automatically when you boot Windows XP, you do not need to do anything with manual services.

However, all services listed as automatic start when Windows XP boots. These are the services that increase boot time. As I have mentioned, many of them are necessary and important, so you should not stop automatic services from booting unless you are sure of the ramifications. You can get this information by looking at the Description column. Here’s a quick look at common services you may want to live without:

Automatic Updates: This service enables Windows XP to check the Web automatically for updates. If you don’t want to use Automatic Updates, you can disable the service. You can always check for updates manually at the Windows Update Web site.

Computer Browser: If your computer is not on a network, you don’t need this service. If you are on a network, leave it alone.

DHCP Client: If you are not on a network, you do not need this service. If you are on a small workgroup, you can still increase boot time by configuring manual IP addresses (which I explore later in this chapter).

DNS Client: If you are not on a network, you do not need this service. If you are, leave it alone.

Error Reporting and Event Log: You don’t have to use these services but they can be very helpful, so I would leave them configured as automatic.

Fax: If you don’t use your computer for fax services, you can disable this one.

Help and Support: If you never use the Windows XP Help and Support Center (found on the Start menu), you can disable this service.

IMAPI CD-Burning COM: This service enables you to burn CDs on your computer. If you never burn CDs, you can disable the service.

Indexing Service: Your computer keeps an index of files but if you rarely search for files, the service is just a resource hog. You can stop it and turn the service to manual.

Windows Firewall/Internet Connection Sharing: If you do not use these features, you can disable them.

Infrared Monitor: If you do not use infrared devices, you can disable this service.

Messenger: This service sends alert messages on a local area network (it is not the same as Windows Messenger). If you are not on a network, you can disable this service.

Print Spooler: If you do not do any printing from the computer, you can disable this service. If you print, make sure you leave it as automatic.

Remote Registry: This service allows remote users to modify the Registry on your computer. If you are not on a network, you can disable this service.

System Restore Service: This service allows you to use System Restore. If you have turned off System Restore anyway, you do not need to turn off the service. If you do, you turn off System Restore.

Themes: If you do not use themes, you can disable this service.

Windows Image Acquisition: If you do not use scanners or digital cameras, you can disable this service.

Wireless Zero Configuration: If do not use wireless networking devices, you can disable this service.
You may have a number of other automatic services, depending on software and other configurations on your computer. So it’s a good idea to look through the services and learn more about them. If you double-click a service, a Properties dialog box appears (see Figure 4-3).

Notice that on the General tab, you see a Startup Type drop-down menu. If you want to change an automatic service to manual, select Manual here and click OK. As a general rule, don’t disable a service unless you are sure you will never use it. However, manual configuration allows the service to be started when you find it necessary, thus speeding up your boot time.
However, before you change a service to manual, look at the Dependencies tab (see Figure 4-4). This tab shows you which other services depend upon the service you are considering changing.

Keep in mind that services are necessary for the vast functionality you get with Windows XP. Change only those services that you understand and do not use. How you use your Windows XP computer should be the best guide in terms of optional startup services.

Tip:
The Indexing service and the System Restore service take up a lot of disk space and system resources across the board. You can live without the Indexing service but I suggest that you keep using System Restore. It works great when you are in a bind and this is one case where the loss of speed may not be worth the ramifications of not using System Restore.

Manual IP Addressing on Small Office/Home Networks

Windows XP is configured to help you take care of networking. It uses the TCP/IP protocol for networking in workgroups, or what you might call small office or home networks that do not use a dedicated server.

The problem is that automatic IP addressing can be slow. When your computer boots, it has to query the network to see what IP addresses are already in use and then assign itself one. If you want to speed up the boot time a bit, consider manually assigning IP addresses to all computers on the network. This way, the network computers do not have to worry about locating an automatic IP address. Because one is manually configured, the operating system doesn’t have to spend time solving this problem.

This isn’t a networking book, however, so I won’t delve into the implications of using a manual IP address, but if you are using a computer that functions as a host computer to the Internet (using Internet Connection Sharing [ICS]), you can get into connectivity problems if you change the configuration of the IP address. However, you can still work around this problem by starting with the ICS host computer.

Select Start/Connect To/Show All Connections. Right-click your network adapter card and click Properties. On the General tab, select TCP/IP in the list of services and click the Properties button.
In the TCP/IP properties, you can see if you use an automatic or manual IP address. In the example in Figure 4-5, I have configured a manual IP address of 90.0.0.1 and a default subnet mask. The other computers on my office network each use a different IP address in the same class, such as 90.0.0.2, 90.0.0.3, 90.0.0.4, and so on. This way, each computer has a permanent IP address, which helps increase boot time. Note that if you change the IP addresses of your computers, they must all use the same subnet mask. A default subject mask of 255.255.255.0 will keep you in good shape.

Make sure you understand the implications of changing IP addresses on your network. If you have no networking experience at all, you may be wiser to leave the automatic IP addressing as is and try to gain some speed using the additional suggestions in this chapter.

Disabling Recent Documents History

Windows XP includes a feature that keeps track of all recent documents you have opened or used. The idea is that you can select Start/Recent Documents History and quickly reopen any document you have recently used. I use many documents each day and never use the feature myself. In my opinion, I can keep up with what I want to use without Windows XP doing it for me.

The bad thing about Recent Documents History is that Windows XP has to calculate what should be put there each time you boot Windows, which can slow things down. So, if you never use the Recent Documents History, it’s a good idea to disable it. Here’s how:

1. Open the Registry Editor (select Start/Run, type regedit, and click OK).

2. Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\ CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer.

3. Create a NoRecentDocsHistory D_WORD key. Double-click the value to open it once it is created.

4. Set the Data Value to 1 to enable the restriction.

5. Click OK and close the Registry Editor. You’ll need to restart the computer for the change to take effect.

Disabling the Boot Logo

You can remove the boot logo that appears when you start Windows XP. This little tweak probably shaves only a few seconds off your boot time but seconds count if you are serious about trying to get Windows XP up and running as quickly as possible. The only negative is that if you remove the boot logo, you will also not see any boot messages, such as check disk. (But if you are not having problems with your computer, this isn’t such a big deal.)

To remove the boot logo, follow these steps:

1. Select Start/Run, type msconfig, and click OK.

2. In the System Configuration Utility, click the BOOT.INI tab.

3. On the BOOT.INI tab, click the NOGUIBOOT check box option (see Figure 4-6). Click OK.

Stopping Remote Assistance and Remote Desktop Sharing

In Windows XP Professional, you have two remote networking features called Remote Assistance and Remote Desktop Sharing. These remote networking features are very helpful in a variety of situations but if you don’t use them, it is good idea to disable them to save boot time. You can always enable them later if you want to use them.

Note: If you are interested in using Remote Desktop or Remote Assistance, see my book Windows XP for Power Users: Power Pack published by John Wiley & Sons.

1. Open the Start menu, right-click My Computer, and choose Properties.
2. Click the Remote Tab.
3. Clear both check boxes to disable Remote Assistance and Remote Desktop (see Figure 4-7).

Speeding Up Logons to Windows Domains

Although not technically a part of the boot process, one thing that can slow down your startup time is logging onto a Windows domain. If you do not connect to a Windows domain, you can skip this section. If you do and you notice that logging on seems to take forever, there is a simple explanation. Windows XP attempts to load up networking components asynchronously during startup. Although you can log on using cached credentials instead of waiting for a domain controller to log you on, this feature may greatly slow down your logon process to the network. You’ll see your desktop more quickly but you’ll have to wait longer to use the network. If you change this setting, your boot time will take longer. But at least once you log on you won’t have to wait for the networking services to load. You can stop this behavior by changing a Group Policy setting on your computer.

Follow these steps:

1. Log on as the local computer administrator and select Start/Run. Type gpedit.msc and click OK.

2. In the Group Policy editor, navigate to Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/System/Logon (see Figure 4-9).

3. Double-click “Always wait for the network at computer startup and logon.”

4. Change the setting to Enabled (see Figure 4-10). Click OK and close the Group Policy console.
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Disabling Unused Devices

If you have devices attached to your computer or installed that you do not use, you can reduce the startup time by disabling those devices. The rule to follow is to keep enabled any device that you use or might use, but if you have devices that you do not use on a regular basis, you can disable those devices without uninstalling. When you start the computer, those devices’ drivers won’t have to load, which will help decrease boot time.

To disable a device, follow these steps:

1. Open the Start menu, right-click My Computer, and select Properties.
2. Click the Hardware tab and click the Device Manager button.
3. Expand the category that contains the device that you want to disable.
4. Right-click the device and click Disable (see Figure 4-12). The device is now disabled and remains disabled until you re-enable it in the same manner.
Making Windows XP Start Faster

Disabling Unused Devices

If you have devices attached to your computer or installed that you do not use, you can reduce the startup time by disabling those devices. The rule to follow is to keep enabled any device that you use or might use, but if you have devices that you do not use on a regular basis, you can disable those devices without uninstalling. When you start the computer, those devices’ drivers won’t have to load, which will help decrease boot time.

To disable a device, follow these steps:

1. Open the Start menu, right-click My Computer, and select Properties.

2. Click the Hardware tab and click the Device Manager button.
3. Expand the category that contains the device that you want to disable.
4. Right-click the device and click Disable (see Figure 4-12). The device is now disabled and remains disabled until you re-enable it in the same manner.

Stopping the NVIDIA Driver

If you use an NVIDIA video card, there is a service that runs that seems to slow down boot time and, especially, shutdown time. The general consensus in the hardware community is that the service doesn’t actually do anything, so you should disable it. Disabling the service should not affect the NVIDIA video card but it will help your computer shut down more quickly.

Follow these steps:

1. Open the Click Start menu, right-click My Computer, and select Manage.

2. In the Computer Management console that appears, expand Services and Applications and select Services to open the services window.

3. Locate and highlight the Nvidia Driver Helper service. Right-click it and select Properties.

4. Set the Startup Type drop-down box to Disabled.

5. Click OK and close the Computer Management console.


Actions

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4 responses

5 06 2007
ildiko steiner

Thank you! Your article is clear and easy to follow and seems to be comprehensive.

I wish there was a list of what the start up item abbreviations stood for and actually do. Most of it si all Geek to me.

After I implement your recommendations I’ll let you know how well it worked.

Thank you again, Ildiko

19 07 2008
mr david gahan

After carefully disabling services I managed to reduce boot time from over three and a half minutes TO UNDER 1 MINUTE, Many thanks.On the topic of creating the d_word key it might be worth you mentioning above that thiswill also disable the addrress bar drop down list in IE as well as recent documents, as does the option in start\properties\start menu\customise\ untick checkbox.
Thanks again.

28 10 2009
monemunes

Thanks alot for this creative ideas , it is so useful

22 12 2011
Andreuskas

privet🙂

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